Researchers Find Ways to Image, Characterize Unique New Material

Graphene can come from graphite, but borophene? There’s no such thing as borite. Unlike its carbon cousin, two-dimensional borophene can’t be reduced from a larger natural form. Bulk boron is usually only found in combination with other elements, and is certainly not layered,

Controlling Thermal Conductivity of Polymers with Light

Polymers are regularly used as thermal insulators for everything from keeping beverages hot to keeping sensitive electronics cool. In some cases, polymers can even be used as thermal conductors to enable efficient heating or cooling. In a new study, researchers at the

Superinsulating Aerogel Resists Mechanical and Thermal Shocks

Aerogels are exceptionally lightweight, composite materials containing more than 99 percent air. They can withstand high temperatures and are resistant to many chemicals. Most aerogels studied so far, however, are made from ceramic materials, such as silica, alumina and silicon carbide, and

Charting a Mapfor Determining Negative Thermal Expansion

Most materials exhibit some degree of thermal expansion – that is, they expand when heated and shrink when cooled. Concrete structures are designed with joints that allow for this expansion and contraction, to prevent cracking and structural failure. Some materials, however, exhibit

ACES Investigates Diamond-Laced ABS as Low-Cost 3D Printer Material

Researchers at Australia’s ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) have published a study into the thermal performance of an ABS-diamond composite for 3D printers. The aim of the research is to broaden the selection of available materials for 3D printing, harnessing the

New Way to Cool Computer Chips Involves Laser Metal Printing

Researchers from Binghamton University’s Mechanical Engineering Department have developed a manufacturing technique that will keep electronics cooler by 10 degrees Celsius (18 degrees Fahrenheit), allowing for faster, more efficient computation. Assistant Professor Scott Schiffres and graduate students Arad Azizi and Matthias A.